[Microbiology] Atlas of Direct examination showing local and contaminating materials

Direct examination showing local and contaminating materials, Atlas of Direct examination showing local and contaminating materials, SUBCLINICAL ATLAS, MICROBIOLOGY ATLAS, atlas in medical, atlas in microbiology, tuyenlab.net

Fig 1:  Expectorated sputum, smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, low-power view (LPV). Purulence, none.
Contaminating bacteria and epithelial cells, heavy. No
pathogens seen. A carefully collected sample of lower
respiratory tree material should be submitted. The sample is
saliva, not sputum. There could be several reasons for
submission of this sample to the laboratory. The patient
could have been poorly directed and simply “spit” into the
collection container, or the patient’s cough might not be
productive of sputum.


Fig 2:  Amniotic fluid, cytocentrifuge preparation, Gram
stain, light microscopy, medium-power view (MPV).
Purulence, moderate. Local materials, moderate. No
organisms seen. The presence of purulence (neutrophils or
“polys”) indicates a process suspicious for infection. The
absence of organisms in this normally sterile fluid is a critical
observation. Squamous epithelial cells are local to this
specimen type and confirm that the sample is amniotic fluid.
The blue keratohyalin granules must never be mistaken for
bacteria

Fig 3:  Expectorated sputum, smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, LPV. Purulence, none. Local materials, moderate.
Contaminating bacteria and epithelials, heavy. No pathogens
seen. The bolus of sputum, consisting of mucus with
entrapped alveolar macrophages, confirms that lower
respiratory tree material is present. There is no evidence
of an infectious process. The sputum is heavily coated by
contaminating materials from the oropharynx or mouth.
Contaminating organisms will grow in a routine sputum
culture
.

Fig 4:  Aspirated sputum, smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, high-power view (HPV). Purulence, none.
Local materials, moderate. No organism seen. The alveolar
macrophages and mucus (pink-stained background) are the
local materials from the tracheobronchial tree. This smear
confirms that sputum was sampled and there is no suspicion
for infection and no evidence of significant contamination.
Routine culture of this specimen can grow insignificant oral
flora because culture is more sensitive than direct
examination.

Fig 5:  Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), cytocentrifuge
preparation, Gram stain, light microscopy, HPV. Purulence,
moderate. No organisms seen. CSF is a sterile fluid and
normally does not have purulence. The presence of
neutrophils is critical. Careful observation for bacteria is
mandatory. Acridine orange stain may be helpful in clinical
settings in which bacteria are low in number and gramnegative.
Cytocentrifuged sediments commonly have a
concentration of organisms sufficient for routine microscopy
(105/mL or greater).

Fig 6:  Expectorated sputum, smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, MPV. Purulence, heavy. Local materials,
Curschmann’s spiral. No organisms seen. The Curschmann’s
spiral is material local to the tracheobronchial tree but is not
normal, so it is specifically reported. This spiral may present
in a variety of sizes depending on the size of bronchus
involved. Spirals can be particularly prominent following an
asthmatic episode with bronchial constriction.

Fig 7:  Trauma eye, vitreous aspirate, smear, Gram stain,
light microscopy, HPV. Purulence, none. No organisms seen.
Local materials, light. The light protein background and the
pigment-containing cell are normal material local to the
vitreous of the eye. This local material confirms that the
sample is representative. The ability to see this brown
pigment cell in smear material is related to the eye trauma.
The important emphasis is the absence of purulence.

Fig 8:  Eye, vitreous aspirate, smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, HPV. Purulence, light. Amorphous debris,
moderate. Local materials, light. No organisms seen. This
smear suggests that there has been an injury. The pigment
has undergone phagocytosis and is seen within a large
macrophage. Pigment must never be mistaken for bacteria,
and bacteria must never be overlooked if mixed with local
materials, such as pigment granules.

Fig 9:  Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), cytocentrifuge
smear, Gram stain, light microscopy, HPV. Purulence, heavy.
No organisms seen. Local materials, black particulate debris
(BPD). This size and type of carbon particle is commonly seen
in respiratory samples in small amounts and is usually not
noted in a smear report.

Fig 10:  BAL, cytocentrifuge smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, HPV. Purulence, none. No organisms seen. Local
materials, heavy BPD. This small-size carbon particle seen
prominently in respiratory samples can be associated with
smoking crack cocaine. The gross sample usually has a gray
appearance. BPD should not be confused with gram-positive
cocci.

Fig 11:  BAL, cytocentrifuge smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, HPV. Purulence, none. No organisms seen. Local
materials, BPD moderate. This BPD is irregular in shape and
usually varies in size. This type of carbon debris is commonly
associated with smoke inhalation from house or other types
of fires. In the early phase of smoke inhalation, much of the
BPD will be extracellular. Later much of the debris will be
intracellular within phagocytes. The golden-colored
macrophage present contains yellow material associated
with cigarette smoking.

Fig 12:  BAL, cytocentrifuge smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, HPV. Purulence, none. No organisms seen. Local
materials, alveolar macrophages containing very small, light
to golden yellow, refractile but not polarizing particles.
These small, fine particles can be hemosiderin, sometimes
deposited as small particles or other fine particles from the
environment. Such refractile particles are not usually
reported except in response to specific questions from the
patient’s physician

Fig 13:  BAL, cytocentrifuge smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, HPV. Purulence, none. No organisms seen. Local
materials, alveolar macrophages containing golden yellow to
Gram’s safranin-colored chunky, irregular particles consistent
with hemosiderin. This type of large particle hemosiderin
deposition within lung phagocytes is commonly associated
with blood in the lung as seen in heart failure or aspirated
blood from large-volume nosebleeds. Blood and hemosiderin
in a Gram-stained smear make smear viewing more difficult.


COMMENTS

Name

CLINICAL ATLAS,45,EMERGENCY ATLAS,1,HAEMATOLOGY ATLAS,9,MICROBIOLOGY ATLAS,38,PARASITOLOGY ATLAS,4,PEDIATRIC ATLAS,42,SUBCLINICAL ATLAS,51,
ltr
item
Atlas for Medical: [Microbiology] Atlas of Direct examination showing local and contaminating materials
[Microbiology] Atlas of Direct examination showing local and contaminating materials
Direct examination showing local and contaminating materials, Atlas of Direct examination showing local and contaminating materials, SUBCLINICAL ATLAS, MICROBIOLOGY ATLAS, atlas in medical, atlas in microbiology, tuyenlab.net
https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-TH1igmkd6bQ/V7HfHtNaKXI/AAAAAAAABf8/n1ArN5bDEU8qfr5Q3fcsuZxK2mzP81ZHACLcB/s400/vs1.jpg
https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-TH1igmkd6bQ/V7HfHtNaKXI/AAAAAAAABf8/n1ArN5bDEU8qfr5Q3fcsuZxK2mzP81ZHACLcB/s72-c/vs1.jpg
Atlas for Medical
http://www.tuyenlab.net/2016/08/microbiology-atlas-of-direct.html
http://www.tuyenlab.net/
http://www.tuyenlab.net/
http://www.tuyenlab.net/2016/08/microbiology-atlas-of-direct.html
true
3150612095398522649
UTF-8
Loaded All Posts Not found any posts VIEW ALL Readmore Reply Cancel reply Delete By Home PAGES POSTS View All RECOMMENDED FOR YOU LABEL ARCHIVE SEARCH ALL POSTS Not found any post match with your request Back Home Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat January February March April May June July August September October November December Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec just now 1 minute ago $$1$$ minutes ago 1 hour ago $$1$$ hours ago Yesterday $$1$$ days ago $$1$$ weeks ago more than 5 weeks ago Followers Follow THIS CONTENT IS PREMIUM Please share to unlock Copy All Code Select All Code All codes were copied to your clipboard Can not copy the codes / texts, please press [CTRL]+[C] (or CMD+C with Mac) to copy