[Microbiology] Atlas of Direct examination in common bacterial infections

Atlas of Direct examination in common bacterial infections, Direct examination in common bacterial infections, SUBCLINICAL ATLAS, MICROBIOLOGY ATLAS, atlas in Microbiology, atlas in medical, tuyenlab.net

Fig 1:  Expectorated sputum, smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, MPV. Purulence, light. Amorphous debris,
moderate. Gram-positive diplococci, encapsulated,
extracellular. Impression: pneumococcal disease.
This is a typical smear presentation for early pneumococcal
pneumonia. The pneumococci have proliferated to high
numbers, and the lung is responding with increased mucus
and fluid release. There is early migration of the neutrophils,
but phagocytosis of the diplococci is limited. Routine
bacterial culture of this sample should yield a heavy growth
of Streptococcus pneumoniae.


Fig 2:  Expectorated sputum, smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, HPV. Purulence, heavy. The presence of
grampositive diplococci, intracellular morphology suggest
antibiotic effect. Impression: pneumococcal disease.
This is a typical smear presentation of a treated but
unresolved pneumococcal pneumonia. Neutrophils cover the
field, the diplococci are largely intracellular and partially
digested, and the background amorphous material is gone.
Routine bacterial culture of this sample may be negative for
typical colonies of S. pneumoniae. A few colonies may be
found by a careful search among the contaminating normal
biota colonies.

Fig 3:  Aspirated sputum, smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, MPV. Purulence, light. Amorphous debris, heavy.
Gram-positive cocci, pairs, encapsulated, extracellular. Initial
antibiotic therapy can be directed toward streptococci and
staphylococci (Stomatococcus). Routine bacterial culture
isolated a pure growth of an encapsulated strain of
Streptococcus pyogenes. The heavy amorphous background
is protein-rich edema fluid from the capillary bed damaged
by S. pyogenes toxins. The patient subsequently died of the
infection despite correct antibiotic therapy and a correct
diagnosis.

Fig 4:  Wound, smear, Gram stain, light microscopy,
MPV. Purulence, moderate. Amorphous debris, moderate.
Gram-positive cocci, chains, extracellular. Impression:
streptococcal disease.
The presence of typical chains of Streptococcus on a
background showing purulence with poorly preserved
“polys” and amorphous debris is suggestive of hemolytic
streptococci with tissue cytotoxicity. Routine bacterial culture
yielded a pure growth of S. pyogenes.

Fig 5:  Expectorated sputum, smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, MPV. Purulence, light. Local materials,
moderate. Gram-positive cocci, pairs, groups, intracellular
and extracellular. Impression: staphylococcal disease.
Smear morphology is typical for staphylococci, but no
staphylococcal colonies were present on the culture plates.
Stomatococcus mucilaginosus colonies were present in high
numbers. Careful correlation between direct and culture
examinations demonstrated this organism to be the
probable cause of infection. The presumptive report
implying or suggesting staphylococci followed by a negative
culture report without explanation raises doubts about the
competence of the laboratory.

Fig 6:  Abscess aspirate, smear, Gram stain, light
microscopy, MPV. Purulence, heavy. Gram-positive cocci,
groups, extracellular. Impression: staphylococcal disease.
Aerobic and anaerobic culture plates were negative at 24
hours. There was culture isolation of Staphylococcus aureus
from this same abscess 5 days previously. The patient was
being treated with clindamycin. Because the cocci in the
smear did not appear antibiotic damaged, another species of
gram-positive coccus was sought. The anaerobic culture grew
Peptostreptococcus organisms, which are clindamycin
resistant.

This is a part of the book : Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology 4th edition 2011 of authors: Connie R. Mahon, Donald C. Lehman and George Manuselis. If you want to view the full content of the book and support author. Please buy it here: http://amzn.to/2ctxo02

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CLINICAL ATLAS,45,EMERGENCY ATLAS,1,HAEMATOLOGY ATLAS,9,MICROBIOLOGY ATLAS,38,PARASITOLOGY ATLAS,4,PEDIATRIC ATLAS,42,SUBCLINICAL ATLAS,51,
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Atlas for Medical: [Microbiology] Atlas of Direct examination in common bacterial infections
[Microbiology] Atlas of Direct examination in common bacterial infections
Atlas of Direct examination in common bacterial infections, Direct examination in common bacterial infections, SUBCLINICAL ATLAS, MICROBIOLOGY ATLAS, atlas in Microbiology, atlas in medical, tuyenlab.net
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