[Microbiology] Atlas of Haemophilus and Other Fastidious Gram-Negative Bacilli

Haemophilus and Other Fastidious Gram-Negative Bacilli, Atlas of Haemophilus and Other Fastidious Gram-Negative Bacilli, SUBCLINICAL ATLAS, MICROBIOLOGY ATLAS, tuyenlab.net, atlas in medical

1. Haemophilus, HACEK Group, and Similar Microorganisms

Prevalence of gram-negative bacilli isolated from cultures in a large tertiary hospital. Data on Pasteurella, Brucella, Legionella, and Bordetella are not included.
Fig 1. Prevalence of gram-negative bacilli isolated from cultures in a large
tertiary hospital. Data on Pasteurella, Brucella, Legionella, and Bordetella are not included.

Fig 2. Haemophilus influenzae satellitism around
and between the large, white, hemolytic staphylococci. The
small, gray glistening colony is H. influenzae (arrow).



Lesions of chancroid on the penis, showing draining bubo (arrow) in the adjacent groin area. Chancroid is caused by Haemophilus ducreyi.
Fig 3.  Lesions of chancroid on the penis, showing
draining bubo (arrow) in the adjacent groin area. Chancroid
is caused by Haemophilus ducreyi.

Fig 4.  Direct smear of Haemophilus influenzae
in cerebrospinal fluid in a case of meningitis. Note the
intracellular and extracellular, gram-negative coccobacilli.

Gram stain of a Haemophilus influenzaecolony.  Note the slightly more elongated bacilli.
Fig 5. Gram stain of a Haemophilus influenzae colony.
 Note the slightly more elongated bacilli.

Fig 6.  Example of Haemophilus influenzae growingon chocolate agar. 
Notice the tan mucoid colonies characteristic of encapsulated strains
.

Fig 7. This organism would be identified as Haemophilus influenzae 
because it requires both X and V factors.

This organism requires V factor only would be identified as Haemophilus parainfluenzae.
Fig 8. This organism requires V factor only would beidentified as 
Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

This organism is positive for X factor only
Fig 9.  This organism is positive for X factor only.
The probable species is Aggregatibacter aphrophilus because
this species can appear to be hemin dependent on initial isolation.

Under ultraviolet light, the organism on the bottom is exhibiting a positive porphyrin reaction. The organism on the top is porphyrin negative
Fig 10.  Under ultraviolet light, the organism on the bottom is exhibiting a positive porphyrin reaction. The organism on the top is porphyrin negative

An Aggregatibacter aphrophilus isolate that is not X factor  dependent and is growing over the entire surface of a trypticase soy agar plate.
Fig 11.  An Aggregatibacter aphrophilus isolate that is not X factor 
dependent and is growing over the entire
surface of a trypticase soy agar plate.

Aggregatibacter aphrophilus growing onsheep blood agar.
Fig 12. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus growing onsheep blood agar.

Gram stain, microscopic morphology of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus
Fig 13.  Gram stain, microscopic morphology of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus (1000×).

Gram stain morphology of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus
Fig 14. Gram stain morphology of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus

Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans on sheep blood agar.
Fig 15.  Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans on sheep blood agar. The star-shaped centers of the colonies are not usually evident until after 48 hours of incubation
and are best observed using a 100× magnification (light
microscope) or a stereomicroscope.

The 48-hour growth of colonies of Cardiobacterium hominis on sheep blood agar.
Fig 16. The 48-hour growth of colonies of Cardiobacterium hominis on sheep blood agar.

Gram stain of Cardiobacterium hominisshowing typical “rosettes”
Fig 17.  Gram stain of Cardiobacterium hominisshowing typical “rosettes” (1000×).

Growth of Eikenella corrodens on chocolateagar.
Fig 18.  Growth of Eikenella corrodens on chocolate agar.

Gram-stain morphology of Eikenella corrodens
Fig 19. Gram-stain morphology of Eikenella corrodens (1000×)

Gram stain of Kingella kingae illustrating the plump bacilli in chains. Compare with the other members of the HACEK group (1000×).
Fig 20.  Gram stain of Kingella kingae illustrating the plump bacilli in chains. Compare with the other members of the HACEK group (1000×).

Growth of Capnocytophaga organisms onchocolate agar.
Fig 21. Growth of Capnocytophaga organisms onchocolate agar. 
Notice the spreading away from the center
of the colony. Compare this growth with Eikenella

Gram stain of Capnocytophaga organisms
Fig 22. Gram stain of Capnocytophaga organisms(1000×). 
Notice the thin fusiform bacilli.

Advanced periodontitis
Fig 23.  Advanced periodontitis. Periodontitis is the inflammation of the periodontium caused by a complex reaction initiated when subgingival plaque bacteria are in
close contact with the epithelium of the gingival sulcus

.

Pasteurella multocida growing on sheep blood agar and chocolate agar.
Fig 24. Pasteurella multocida growing on sheep blood agar and chocolate agar.
The MacConkey agar plate is negative growth.

 Brucella melitensis colonies on sheep blood agar appear smooth, raised, and translucent.
Fig 25. Brucella melitensis colonies on sheep blood agar appear smooth, raised, and translucent.

Francisella tularensis colonies grown onchocolate agar.
Fig 26.  Francisella tularensis colonies grown onchocolate agar. 
Gray-white, raised colonies with a smooth
appearance are visible following 72 hours of incubation.

2. Legionella
Gram stain of specimen demonstratingintracellular and  extracellular Legionella pneumophila
Fig 27.  Gram stain of specimen demonstratingintracellular and 
extracellular Legionella pneumophila(1000×).

Nonselective buffered charcoal yeast extract (BCYE) agar plateinoculated  with sputum specimen. Note overgrowth of respiratory flora. B, Selective BCYE agar plate inoculated with same sputum specimen, which has been acid-washed before inoculation. Much of the respiratory flora has been eliminated. Legionella colonies are the smallest ones in the first quadrant.
Fig 28. A, Nonselective buffered charcoal yeast extract (BCYE) agar plateinoculated 
with sputum specimen. Note overgrowth of respiratory flora. B, Selective BCYE agar plate inoculated with same sputum specimen, which has been acid-washed
before inoculation. Much of the respiratory flora has been eliminated. Legionella
colonies are the smallest ones in the first quadrant.

A, Legionella pneumophila colony on buffered charcoal yeast extract(BCYE) agar after 3 days of incubation, viewed with a dissecting microscope (20×). B, Same colony after 4 days of incubation. C, Same colony after 5 days of incubation. D, Same colony after 7 days of incubation.
Fig 29. A, Legionella pneumophila colony on buffered charcoal yeast extract(BCYE) agar after 3 days of incubation, viewed with a dissecting microscope (20×).
B, Same colony after 4 days of incubation. C, Same colony after 5 days of incubation.
D, Same colony after 7 days of incubation.

Schema for identification of Legionella organisms. BCYE, Buffered charcoal yeast extract; LRT, lower respiratory tract; DFA, direct fluorescent antibody. *Biohazard precautions; consider organisms such as Francisella spp.
Fig 30. Schema for identification of Legionella organisms. BCYE, Bufferedcharcoal yeast extract; LRT, lower respiratory tract; DFA, direct fluorescent antibody.
*Biohazard precautions; consider organisms such as Francisella spp.

A, Legionella pneumophila in specimen smear stained by direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) technique (450×). B, Legionella pneumophila in specimen smear stained by DFA technique (1000×). Note intense peripheral staining of the organisms.
Fig 31. A, Legionella pneumophila in specimen smear stained by directfluorescent antibody (DFA) technique (450×). B, Legionella pneumophila in specimen
smear stained by DFA technique (1000×). Note intense peripheral staining of the
organisms.
3. Bordetella
Five-day-old colonies of Bordetella pertussis on charcoal–horse blood agar (incident light from lower right corner).
Fig 32. Five-day-old colonies of Bordetella pertussison charcoal–horse blood agar (incident light from lower right corner).



This is only a part of the book : Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology 4th edition 2011 of authors: Connie R. Mahon, Donald C. Lehman and George Manuselis. If you want to view the full content of the book and support author. Please buy it here: https://goo.gl/IawVC1


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Atlas for Medical: [Microbiology] Atlas of Haemophilus and Other Fastidious Gram-Negative Bacilli
[Microbiology] Atlas of Haemophilus and Other Fastidious Gram-Negative Bacilli
Haemophilus and Other Fastidious Gram-Negative Bacilli, Atlas of Haemophilus and Other Fastidious Gram-Negative Bacilli, SUBCLINICAL ATLAS, MICROBIOLOGY ATLAS, tuyenlab.net, atlas in medical
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