[Microbiology] Atlas of Clinical Virology

Atlas of Clinical Virology, Clinical Virology, Clinical Virology images, tuyenlab.net, atlas in medical, MICROBIOLOGY ATLAS, SUBCLINICAL ATLAS

Card format rapid immunochromatographic membrane assay
Fig 1. A, Card format rapid immunochromatographic membrane assay,
BinaxNow (Scarborough, Me.), for three common respiratory viruses: influenza A and B
and respiratory syncytial viruses. B, Examples of positive and negative results.



Fig 2. A, Herpes simplex virus (HSV) from the skin, showing cytopathic effect
(CPE) in less than 1 day on rabbit kidney cells. B, HSV showing CPE in less than 1 day on HeLa cells.

Fig 3. Cytomegalovirus from cerebrospinal fluid
forming cytopathic effect on diploid fibroblast cells.

Cytopathic effect of adenovirus on HeLa cells.
Fig 4. Cytopathic effect of adenovirus on HeLa cells.

Transmission electron micrograph of adenovirus.
Fig 5. Transmission electron micrograph of adenovirus.

Advanced cytopathic effect in an A549 cell line due to herpes simplex virus infection.
Fig 6. Advanced cytopathic effect in an A549 cell
line due to herpes simplex virus infection.

Active cytomegalovirus infection of lung in patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome
Fig 7. Active cytomegalovirus infection of lung
in patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
Histopathology of lung shows cytomegalic pneumocyte
containing characteristic intranuclear inclusion.

Fig 8. Negatively stained transmission electron
micrograph revealing the presence of numerous Epstein-Barr virus virions.

Fig 9. Serologic evaluation of Epstein-Barr virus infection (infectious
mononucleosis) showing the rise and fall of detectable antibodies.

Fig 10. Electron micrograph of a varicella virus.

Negatively stained transmission electron micrograph of the smallpox (variola) virus.
Fig 11. Negatively stained transmission electron
micrograph of the smallpox (variola) virus.

ransmission electron micrograph revealing the ultrastructure morphology of norovirus virions.
Fig 12. ransmission electron micrograph revealing
the ultrastructure morphology of norovirus virions.

Electron micrograph of the coronavirus
Fig 13. Electron micrograph of the coronavirus. This
virus derives its name from the fact that under electron
microscopy the virion is surrounded by a “corona” or halo.

Transmission electron micrograph of the Ebola virus.
Fig 14. Transmission electron micrograph of the Ebola virus.

Patient presenting on the third pre-eruptive day with Koplik’s spots indicative of the onset of measles.
Fig 15. Patient presenting on the third pre-eruptive
day with Koplik’s spots indicative of the onset of measle
s.

Fig 16. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Human immunodeficiency immunoblot
Fig 17. Human immunodeficiency immunoblot.
Reactive protein (p) bands appear as purplish lines across the
strip. Proteins with higher molecular weights appear at the
top of the strip. Structural and nonstructural proteins are
given RNA structural genome codes: GAG, group-specific
antigens; POL, polymerase; and ENV, envelope. ENC codes
for glycoprotein precursors (gp)—gp160, gp120, and gp41
through gp43. POL codes for p65, p51, and p31. GAG codes
for p55, p24, and p17. Results are negative, indeterminate,
or positive based on the pattern on the strip. Positive:
Reactivity with a score of + or greater to GAG p24 or ENV
gp120/gp160 or gp41. Indeterminate: The appearance of one
or more bands in a pattern that does not satisfy the positive
criteria. Negative: The absence of any band on the strips.

Fig 18. Serologic evaluation of hepatitis A virus infection showing the rise and
fall of detectable antibodies.




Fig 19. Serologic evaluation of hepatitis B virus infection showing the rise andfall of detectable antibodies. A, Serologic presentation in acute hepatitis infection with
resolution. B, Serologic presentation in chronic hepatitis infection with late
seroconversion.



Fig 20. Serologic evaluation of hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection showingpersistence of detectable antibodies indicating the presence of replicating HDV.


Fig 21. Serologic evaluation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection showing
persistence of deectable antibodies, indicating the presence of replication HCV.

This is part of the book: Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology 4e 2011. If you are interested and want to own this book. Buy it here: https://goo.gl/IawVC1

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Atlas for Medical: [Microbiology] Atlas of Clinical Virology
[Microbiology] Atlas of Clinical Virology
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