[Microbiology] Atlas of Ocular Infections

Atlas of Ocular Infections, Ocular Infections, Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology 4th edition 2011, Connie R. Mahon, Donald C. Lehman and George Manuselis, tuyenlab.net, atlas for medical, atlas for Microbiology

Common ocular structures.
Fig 1. Common ocular structures.


Gonococcal conjunctivitis. Note the copious discharge in response to invasion by Neisseria gonorrhoeae.
Fig 2. Gonococcal conjunctivitis. Note the copious
discharge in response to invasion by Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

A, White spots on the conjunctiva represent pockets of Chlamydia organisms in tissue. B, Immunofluorescence stain of scrapings from neonatal conjunctivitis, confirming the presence of chlamydial elementary bodies.
Fig 3. A, White spots on the conjunctiva represent pockets of Chlamydia
organisms in tissue. B, Immunofluorescence stain of scrapings from neonatal
conjunctivitis, confirming the presence of chlamydial elementary bodies.

Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis
Fig 4. Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis. The
etiologic agent is usually enterovirus 70 or coxsackievirus
A24. Other members of the enterovirus group may also be
recovered. Note the heavy conjunctival hemorrhaging.

Fig 5. A, Corneal melt caused by bacterial invasion. B, C streaks of
Staphylococcus aureus from infected cornea. The enzymes produced by some strains of
S. aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can liquefy the cornea within 48 hours.

Fig 6. A, Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from daily-wear (soft) contact lens.
Patient had an ulcerative keratitis. The corneal culture also grew P. aeruginosa. B, Recent
trends in bacteria recovered from contact lenses and solutions.

Fig 7. Colonies of Mycobacterium fortuitum
growing on infected corneal graft tissue.

Frequency of common keratitis viral isolates in southern Florida
Fig 8. Frequency of common keratitis viral isolates
in southern Florida. HSV-1, Herpes simplex virus type 1;
HSV-2, herpes simplex virus type 2.

“Tracts” of Acanthamoeba trophozoites
Fig 9. “Tracts” of Acanthamoeba trophozoites. The
meandering trophozoites are at the end of the tracts. The
large clusters of organisms contain trophozoites and cysts.

Gram stain revealing the oval cyst of Microsporidia spp
Fig 10. Gram stain revealing the oval cyst of
Microsporidia spp. Organisms can also be detected with
Giemsa, acid-fast, and calcofluor white stains.

Dacryocystitis (infection of the lacrimal sac) of the left eye (arrow) in a young child.
Fig 11. Dacryocystitis (infection of the lacrimal sac)
of the left eye (arrow) in a young child.

Fig 12. A, Section from filter used to concentrate vitreous fluids. Once filtered,
the 0.45-µm filter is then sectioned and placed on selected media. B, Curvularia spp. from
intraocular fluids on 0.45-µm filter section. C, Burkholderia cepacia on a filter from a
vitrectomy specimen.


Acute cytomegalovirus retinitis with optic nerve involvement in a 40-year-old patient who is HIV positive
Fig 13. Acute cytomegalovirus retinitis with optic
nerve involvement in a 40-year-old patient who is HIV
positive. Active viral particles are seen in satellite lesions
temporal to the main infection (yellow).

Kaposi sarcoma (raised dark spots) on the conjunctiva of a patient who has AIDS.
Fig 14. Kaposi sarcoma (raised dark spots) on the
conjunctiva of a patient who has AIDS.

Toxoplasma gondii trophozoites and cysts in retinal tissue.
Fig 15. Toxoplasma gondii trophozoites and cysts in
retinal tissue. This protozoan has a predilection for ocular
tissue. This disease is now more common in HIV patients
than in the general U.S. population.

Extruded scleral buckle on blood agar plate with growth of Candida albicans.
Fig 16. Extruded scleral buckle on blood agar plate
with growth of Candida albicans.

Fungal (yeast) biofilm on contact lens. Culture grew Candida albicans.
Fig 17. Fungal (yeast) biofilm on contact lens.
Culture grew Candida albicans.

A, Concretions being expressed from canaliculi. B, “Smashed” and stained concretions, revealing gram-positive, slender, branching rods (Actinomyces israelii).
Fig 18. A, Concretions being expressed from canaliculi. B, “Smashed” and
stained concretions, revealing gram-positive, slender, branching rods (Actinomyces israelii).

Fig 19. Giemsa stain of conjunctival epithelial cells
with chlamydial inclusions (arrow). The Giemsa stain also
provides information on the types and numbers of
inflammatory cells and the condition of the epithelial cells.

Fig 20. A, Cornea stained with rose bengal to outline dendrite infected with
herpes simplex virus (HSV). HSV is the virus most often isolated from corneal dendritic
infections. B, Dendrite on membrane filter collected by impression cytology. The filter
was stained with a monoclonal antibody against HSV-1. Almost all the HSV-infected cells
of the dendrite “lit up” when stained. The uninfected cells do not stain and appear red.

Sabouraud plate with mould and yeast. Patient had a mixed fungal keratitis
Fig 21. Sabouraud plate with mould and yeast.
Patient had a mixed fungal keratitis. Top, The superficial
layer of the cornea was infected with a mould (Fusarium
oxysporum
). Bottom, The deeper layers were infected with a
yeast (Candida albicans).




Fig 22. A, Contact lens and lens solution on 5% sheep blood agar surrounded bygrowth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. B, C streaks growing pigmented and nonpigmented
Serratia marcescens. C, Corneal scrapings. (Note: Each row of C streaks represents a
separate corneal scraping.)


Staphylococcus epidermidis recovered from vitreous fluids (drops) on a blood agar plate
Fig 23. Staphylococcus epidermidis recovered from
vitreous fluids (drops) on a blood agar plate. Samples may
be inoculated onto a chocolate or blood agar plate and
allowed to dry or may be streaked out as for a routine
microbiology specimen.

This is only a part of the book : Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology 4th edition 2011 of authors: Connie R. Mahon, Donald C. Lehman and George Manuselis. If you want to view the full content of the book and support author. Please buy it here: https://goo.gl/IawVC1


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Atlas for Medical: [Microbiology] Atlas of Ocular Infections
[Microbiology] Atlas of Ocular Infections
Atlas of Ocular Infections, Ocular Infections, Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology 4th edition 2011, Connie R. Mahon, Donald C. Lehman and George Manuselis, tuyenlab.net, atlas for medical, atlas for Microbiology
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