[Parasitology] Atlas of Medically Significant Fungi

Atlas of Medically Significant Fungi, Medically Significant Fungi, images, picture, atlas, atlas of medical, tuyenlab.net, Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology 4th edition 2011, Connie R. Mahon, Donald C. Lehman, George Manuselis

Formation of blastoconidia in yeast.
Fig 1. Formation of blastoconidia in yeast.

Aerial mycelia give mould the “woolly” appearance. Vegetative mycelia are responsible for absorbing nutrients from the medium.
Fig 2. Aerial mycelia give mould the “woolly”
appearance. Vegetative mycelia are responsible for
absorbing nutrients from the medium.




A, Specialized structures that are formed in vegetative mycelia by certain fungal species. B, Rhizopus spp. showing rhizoids.
Fig 3. A, Specialized structures that are formed in vegetative mycelia by certain
fungal species. B, Rhizopus spp. showing rhizoids.


A, Phaeoacremonium sp. displaying septate hyphae. B, Zygomycetous hyphae in tissue appears sparsely septate.
Fig 4. A, Phaeoacremonium sp. displaying septate hyphae. B, Zygomycetous
hyphae in tissue appears sparsely septate.


Bipolaris sp. is an example of a dematiaceous fungus. Note the dark pigmentation, which is due to the presence of melanin in the cell wall.
Fig 5. Bipolaris sp. is an example of a dematiaceous
fungus. Note the dark pigmentation, which is due to the
presence of melanin in the cell wall.


An example of asexual reproduction is the production of phialoconidia
Fig 6. An example of asexual reproduction is the
production of phialoconidia. Conidia are formed from
conidiogenous cells like phialide (a vaselike structure).
Phialoconidia are “blown out” of the phialide.

Arthroconidia, another form of asexual reproduction, are formed by fragmentation of fertile hyphae.
Fig 7. Arthroconidia, another form of asexual
reproduction, are formed by fragmentation of fertile
hyphae.

Fig 8. Sexual reproduction occurs by the fusion
of compatible nuclei and subsequent production of a
zygospore.


Asexual reproduction by Zygomycetes is characterized by the production of spores (sporangiospores) from within a sporangium.
Fig 9. Asexual reproduction by Zygomycetes is
characterized by the production of spores (sporangiospores)
from within a sporangium
.

Diagram of the layers of skin and tissues in which fungal infections can occur.
Fig 10. Diagram of the layers of skin and tissues in
which fungal infections can occur.


Fig 11. Diagram of the typical “spaghetti and
meatballs” appearance of Malassezia furfur in a potassium
hydroxide preparation.


Microscopic appearance of Trichosporon species on lactophenol cotton blue preparation showing the presence of both blastoconidia and arthroconidia.
Fig 12. Microscopic appearance of Trichosporon
species on lactophenol cotton blue preparation showing the
presence of both blastoconidia and arthroconidia.


Microscopic structures of Phaeoannellomyces werneckii, showing characteristic budding annelloconidia. P. werneckii causes tinea nigra.
Fig 13. Microscopic structures of Phaeoannellomyces
werneckii
, showing characteristic budding annelloconidia.
P. werneckii causes tinea nigra.


Microsporum canis showing spindle-shaped, echinulate macroconidia with thick walls and tapered ends, which are key features in identification of this species.
Fig 14. Microsporum canis showing spindle-shaped,
echinulate macroconidia with thick walls and tapered ends,
which are key features in identification of this species.


Microsporum gypseum showing fusiform, moderately thick-walled macroconidia containing several cells.
Fig 15. Microsporum gypseum showing fusiform,
moderately thick-walled macroconidia containing several
cells.


Trichophyton mentagrophytes showing globose, teardrop-shaped microconidia. (Nomarski optics, 1250×).
Fig 16. Trichophyton mentagrophytes showing
globose, teardrop-shaped microconidia. (Nomarski optics,
1250×).


Fig 17. Trichophyton rubrum showing clavate- or
peg-shaped microconidia.

A, Conidia of Phialophora verrucosa at the tips of phialides with collarettes (Nomarski optics, 1250×). B, Conidial arrangement of Cladophialophora carrionii.
Fig 18. A, Conidia of Phialophora verrucosa at the tips of phialides with
collarettes (Nomarski optics, 1250×). B, Conidial arrangement of Cladophialophora
carrionii
.

Actinomycotic mycetoma showing fine-branching, filamentous rods in tissue sample (A), compared with the hyphal elements (B) seen in eumycotic infections (1250×).
Fig 19. Actinomycotic mycetoma showing fine-branching, filamentous rods in
tissue sample (A), compared with the hyphal elements (B) seen in eumycotic infections
(1250×).


The Scedosporium apiospermum anamorph of Pseudallescheria boydii. (Nomarski optics, 625×).
Fig 20. The Scedosporium apiospermum anamorph
of Pseudallescheria boydii. (Nomarski optics, 625×).

Sexual structures (cleistothecia containing ascospores) of Pseudallescheria boydii. (Nomarski optics, 325×).
Fig 21. Sexual structures (cleistothecia containing
ascospores) of Pseudallescheria boydii. (Nomarski optics, 325×).


Fig 22. Conidia of Exophiala sp. borne at the tips of
annellides. (Nomarski optics, 1250×).

Conidia of Exophiala dermatitidis borne at the tips of phialides as well as the black yeast synanamorph. (Nomarski optics, 1250×).
Fig 23. Conidia of Exophiala dermatitidis borne at
the tips of phialides as well as the black yeast synanamorph.
(Nomarski optics, 1250×).


Yeast phase of Sporothrix schenckii showing cigar-shaped yeast cells typical of the species
Fig 24. A, Yeast phase of Sporothrix schenckii showing cigar-shaped yeast cells
typical of the species. B, Mould phase of S. schenckii revealing hyaline conidia borne at
the ends of conidiophore in “rosettes” as well as dematiaceous conidia along the sides
of the hyphae. (Nomarski optics, 625×).


Fig 25. Conversion of the mould phase of
Blastomyces dermatitidis to the “broad-based bud” yeast
form. (Nomarski optics, 1250×).


Mould phase of Blastomyces dermatitidis grown on potato flakes agar. (Nomarski optics, 1250×).
Fig 26. Mould phase of Blastomyces dermatitidis
grown on potato flakes agar. (Nomarski optics, 1250×).


Fig 27. The exoantigen immunodiffusion test (A); a band of identity between
culture filtrate 2 and control antigen (B); a band of nonidentity (C); and a band of
partial identity (D).


Spherules of Coccidioides immitis in tissue (300×).
Fig 28. Spherules of Coccidioides immitis in tissue (300×).

Mould phase of Coccidioides immitis, 25° C. (Nomarski optics, 1250×).
Fig 29. Mould phase of Coccidioides immitis, 25° C.
(Nomarski optics, 1250×).


A, Bone marrow aspirate stained with Giemsa showing the yeast cells of Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum inside the monocytes (1200×). B, Tissue phase of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum. (Gomori methylene stain, 1200×).
Fig 30. A, Bone marrow aspirate stained with Giemsa showing the yeast cells of
Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum inside the monocytes (1200×). B, Tissue phase of
H. capsulatum var. capsulatum. (Gomori methylene stain, 1200×).


Large tuberculate macroconidia of Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum (Nomarski optics, 1250×).
Fig 31. Large tuberculate macroconidia of
Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum (Nomarski optics, 1250×).

Fig 32. Yeast phase (“mariner’s wheel”) of
Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with multipolar budding.
(Nomarski optics, 1250×).


Absidia sp.
Fig 33. Absidia sp.

Cunninghamella sp.
Fig 34. Cunninghamella sp.

Mucor sp.
Fig 35. Mucor sp.

Rhizopus sp.
Fig 36. Rhizopus sp.

Syncephalastrum sp.
Fig 37. Syncephalastrum sp.

Aspergillus sp.
Fig 38. Aspergillus sp.

Beauveria sp.
Fig 39. Beauveria sp.

Chrysosporium sp.
Fig 40. Chrysosporium sp.

Fusarium sp.
Fig 41. Fusarium sp.

Geotrichum sp.
Fig 42. Geotrichum sp.

Paecilomyces sp.
Fig 43. Paecilomyces sp.

Penicillium sp.
Fig 44. Penicillium sp.

Scopulariopsis sp
Fig 45. Scopulariopsis sp

Trichoderma sp.
Fig 46. Trichoderma sp.

Alternaria sp.
Fig 47. Alternaria sp.

Chaetomium sp.
Fig 48. Chaetomium sp.

Cladosporium sp.
Fig 49. Cladosporium sp.

Curvularia sp.
Fig 50. Curvularia sp.

Phoma sp.
Fig 51.  Phoma sp.


Pithomyces sp.
Fig 52.  Pithomyces sp.

Ulocladium sp.
Fig 53. Ulocladium sp.

India ink preparation is used primarily to examine cerebrospinal fluid for the presence of the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans
Fig 54. India ink preparation is used primarily
to examine cerebrospinal fluid for the presence of the
encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans. This is an India
ink preparation from an exudate containing encapsulated
budding yeasts.

A, Pneumocystis jiroveci cysts (silver stain). B, P. jiroveci (Giemsa stain). Notice the circular arrangement of intracystic bodies within a faint outline of cyst wall in center of field.
Fig 55. A, Pneumocystis jiroveci cysts (silver stain). B, P. jiroveci (Giemsa stain).
Notice the circular arrangement of intracystic bodies within a faint outline of cyst wall in
center of field.


Guideline for the identification of fungal isolates. LPCB, lactophenol cotton blue.

Guideline for the identification of fungal isolates. LPCB, lactophenol cotton blue.
Fig 56. Guideline for the identification of fungal isolates. LPCB, lactophenol
cotton blue.


Fig 57. Bone marrow stained with Giemsa stain
showing the yeast phase of Histoplasma capsulatum var.
capsulatum.

Fig 58.  A positive hair perforation test shows
penetration of the fungal agent in the hair shaft. This is the
typical reaction by
Trichophyton mentagrophytes, whereas
Trichophyton rubrum causes only surface erosion of hair
shaft.

Fig 59. Schematic diagram showing how the germ-tube test can be used to
presumptively identify yeasts.




Germ-tube production by Candida albicans. A positive germ tube has no constriction at its base.
Fig 60.  Germ-tube production by Candida albicans.
A positive germ tube has no constriction at its base.

Candida tropicalis shows constriction at the base of the germ tube, called a pseudogerm tube.
Fig 61. Candida tropicalis shows constriction at the
base of the germ tube, called a pseudogerm tube.


Fig 62. Candida albicans on cornmeal agar showing
typical chlamydospores.


Pseudohyphae occur when the blastoconidia germinate and form a filamentous mat.
Fig 63. Pseudohyphae occur when the blastoconidia
germinate and form a filamentous mat.



This is only a part of the book : Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology 4th edition 2011 of authors: Connie R. Mahon, Donald C. Lehman and George Manuselis. If you want to view the full content of the book and support author. Please buy it here: https://goo.gl/IawVC1



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Atlas for Medical: [Parasitology] Atlas of Medically Significant Fungi
[Parasitology] Atlas of Medically Significant Fungi
Atlas of Medically Significant Fungi, Medically Significant Fungi, images, picture, atlas, atlas of medical, tuyenlab.net, Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology 4th edition 2011, Connie R. Mahon, Donald C. Lehman, George Manuselis
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